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OUR ADVERTISERS— STETSON ORACLE 




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Stetson Oracle 



Published during the academic year by the students of Stetson High School 

Randolph, Massachusetts 



VOL. XIX. No. 2 



June, 1936 



JUJ E DEDICATE this issue of the ORACLE to Ernest F. Grout, who 

is lost to us and whom we greatly miss. His warm friendly 

smile and sunny disposition were well known to all of us. We 

have long admired him, his personality, his determination, and his 

ambition to make good ; and we are indeed sorry that a boy with his 

fine mind is lost to his class, to his school, and to the world. 

ORACLE STAFF - ~~ ~ 

Ruth Hayden and Evelyn Nicoll 



James Ginnitty Editor-in-Chief 

William Marshall Business Manager 

Joseph Flynn Advertising Manager 

George Condon and Bertha Hayden 

Circulation Managers 
Lena Thayer Art Editor 



Staff Poets 

Fred Canavan Jokes 

George Dean, Georgia Saunders 

Sport Editors 
Vera Clark Exchange Editor 



'"PARTING" 

fARTING is such sweet sorrow ! 
The old familiar words best 
express our feelings at this 
time. But in this breaking of our 

friendly associations there is the joy 
of having accomplished something 
we desired and also the bright hope 
of going forward into the wide 
avenues of life, yet strange and un- 
known to us. 

For there are always partings. 
They are the resting places where 
we stop to think, when just for a 
moment we can look backwards 
and in the same glance see indis- 
tinctly the new land before us. Life 
then, seems good and rich with ad- 
venture. 

At graduation let us not talk of 
trials and troubles and rocky roads. 
Inevitably they come to all. But let 
us think of our rare good fortune in 
being one of those who have at- 
tained a good start on the road to 
education. 

Then with our eyes looking for- 
ward let us be ready and alert to 
get the most happiness and success 
from that which lies before us. 



GRADUATION 

/tf RADUATION ! Years of study, 
Ik% hard work, perseverance and 
^^ enjoyment are ended. We can 
no longer rely on our teachers for 
help ; we have reached a point in 
our lives where we must be self- 
dependent in order to make a suc- 
cess of ourselves. We are facing 
the world with eager hearts, ready 
to go forth. The world is ours to 
do as we wish. It is for us to say 
whether or not we make good. 
Without incentive and enthusiasm 
we never can accomplish the things 
that make men famous. 

To our teachers and old acquain- 
tances we extend our heartfelt grat- 
itude and sincere appreciation for 
all they have done for us. Through 
their untiring effort we have been 
given the principles of a good edu- 
cation and the confidence that en- 
ables us to face the world. 

To the classes in the futue we 
wish the best of success and hope 
that they will strive to maintain the 
standards that we endeavored to 
set. There is a tinge of sadness 
mingled with our gladness of fare- 
well, and we, the class of "36", will 
never forget old S. H. S. and our 
splendid motto, "United We Stand." 




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ARY 



STETSON ORACLE 




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PERSONALITY 
By Vera Clark 

PERSONALITY is that indefm- 
% 3 able something which marks 
If a person distinctly from his 
fe low men. Each one of us pos- 
sesses the quality, but in varying 
degrees of vividness. We say of 
one person, "Personality sticks out 
all over him." We say of another, 
"He hasn't any personality." But is 
this latter statement true ? Hardly. 
His personality consists in being 
dull, drab, or uninteresting. There 
is no one in this fair world of ours 
so fortunate as to possess no per- 
sonality, unless he be lying in the 
grave. In that case his personality 
would be in the past tense. 

Supposing we are one of those 
"mousey" creatures, and we desire 
to develop a magnetic personality. 
What, oh what, should we do? On 
browsing through almost any maga- 
zine we will come upon an adver- 
tisement stating in glowing terms 
the marvels to be obtained by fol- 
lowing the advice of "Pego, the 
Great." We avidly read said ad- 
vertisement through several times; 
and then ,that very day, we sneak 
out to the nearest mail box and post 
a letter addressed to Pego. We 
spend a number of anxious days 
awaiting the answer. Finally, it 
comes. What does it say? Our 
heart pounds against our ribs. What 
advice has the great Pego sent? 
After a mad tussle with the obsti- 
nate envelope, we get it open and 
discover . . . Yes, what is it we 
discover? A nice long friendly 
typewritten letter informing us that 
"Pego, the Great," will be most 



pleased to send his book on "How 
to Develop a Magnetic Personality" 
for the extremely low rate of five 
dollars cash. 

Well, that failed. Now, what 
shall we do in order to transform 
our "mousey" personality into a 
vivid one like the school idol's? We 
haven't five dollars. And even if we 
did, we wouldn't send it to "Pego, 
the Great." 

Next, we try Miss Melina Love- 
lorn. Perhaps Miss Lovelorn can 
help us in our plight. We hope so. 
An answer comes to our questing- 
letter. Miss Lovelorn informs us 
that anyone really desiring to do so 
can develop a shining personality. 
All we need is a new hair-dress or 
a new tie to develop confidence in 
our hidden charms and to bring out 
the highlights of our individuality. 
How simple ! We instantly dash 
out and get ourself a new hair-dress 
or tie. Will it work ? We see the 
object of our secret affections. 
Now, we shall see. We shall see. 
If the object smiles sweetly at us, 
we will know that Miss Melinda 
Lovelorn's advice holds true. How- 
ever, the object, just as always, 
does not even see us, even though 
we are right in the way. So that 
didn't work either. If this keeps 
up, we will be a mouse. 

But not yet, are we ready to 
throw up our hands in despair. We 
go, after school, to the psychologi- 
cally inclined teacher. "M-Blank, 
could you please tell us how to ac- 
quire a magnetic personality?" M- 
Blank gazes at us in mild surprise 
and hems, haws, "If you would be 
so kind as to come some time when 
I am not so busy, I will be most glad 



JUNE, 1936 



to help you, if I can." And we do, 
but M-Blank is an unusually over- 
worked teacher. So, at last, we 
give up. What in the world CAN 
we do ? 

All this goes to prove, in more 
ways than one, that changing one's 
personality is not a simple matter, 
although it is possible, if one has 
plenty of patience. 

Studying the many, many person- 
alities we meet in our lifetime is one 
of the most fascinating pastimes 
you could have. There are sweet 



ones, quiet ones, dull ones, mixed 
ones, vivid ones, bizarre ones, and 
all the degrees of variations. Do 
you know what kind of personality 
you have — your brother — your fa- 
vorite teacher? Nine times out of 
ten you never actually noticed. 
When you see a certain person 
often you just never consciously no- 
tice. You take their personalities 
for granted, unless you make a 
habit of studying the people you 
meet. This is very interesting as a 
pastime. Try it. 



THE PROFESSIONAL SOLDIER 

/j\ N The Trail of the Lonesome 
fjtj Pine, Little Lord Fauntleroy, 
^-^ O'Shaughnessy's Boy and 
The Littlest Rebel heard the Voice 
of Bugle Ann call through the wil- 
derness. 

These Three were searching for 
the Professional Soldier who was 
said to be in The Petrified Forest. 

As they neared The Trans-Atlan- 
tic Tunnel, Another Face appeared 
before them. This was Mary Burns, 
Fugitive who was the Last of the 
Pagans. The four journeyed on 
and soon they reached The Milky 
Way where The King of Burlesque 
was spending A Night at the Opera 
with Annie Oakley and the Frisco 
Kid. 

A little farther down the road 
they met Everybody's Old Man who 
was telling The Story of Louis Pas- 
teur while Rose Marie sang of her 
long lost lover, Anthony Adverse. 

Their journey was becoming tire- 
some when the Littlest Rebel 
sighed "Ah Wilderness." It being 
Modern Times and Anything Goes 
they searched for a place to spend 
the night. 

They came to an old deserted 
mansion and upon entering were 
given four keys and told that they 
were the only ones in existence. 
Many things are to happen. 

There is a noise at the door and 
they turn out the lights. A man 
enters. Who is it ? It must be the 
hermit of the mountain. He too 



has a key, but why is he here at 
this time ? He had been Snowed 
Under and has come down to the 

inn to find the Country Doctor who 
has run off with his wife, Gentle 
Julia. 

Another noise is heard at the door 
and Three Men on a Horse enter. 
One is The Singing Kid and the 
other two are Captain Blood and 
Captain January. The latter two 
have just arrived from the Barbary 
Coast. The former has run away 
from home because he has Too 
Many Parents and while cruising on 
the China Seas had Petticoat Fever. 
We now have six keys and yet there 
are only four in existence. It must 
be that I Dream Too Much, for an- 
other noise is heard and a man en- 
ters. Who is it? No, it can't be, 
but it is, The Prisoner of Shark Is- 
land. How did he get away? 
There must have been Mutiny on 
the Bounty, or else the guards are 
Ceiling Zero because their wives 
and sweethearts have gone to Fol- 
low the Fleet. There are now Seven 
Keys to Baldpate. Can there be 
any more ? 

Now there are eight Hands A- 
cross the Table. The door opens and 
The Bride Comes Home exclaiming 
to her husband, "If You Could Only 
Cook, but alas you can not. Next 
Time We Love there will be no 
Chatterbox To Beat The Band. I 
Live My Life and there will be no 
Love Before Breakfast and the Last 
Days of Pompeii will seem like a 
Midsummer Night's Dream." 



STETSON ORACLE 



All could not last forever. She 
Couldn't Take It when the Broad- 
way Gondolier came back telling of 
his Crime and Punishment in the 
Metropolitan and of the Shipsaw he 
had invented which had been exper- 
imented on him. He tries to relate 
A Tale of Two Cities but the strain 



is too much and he departs In Per- 
son into a Magnificent Obsession. 
It Had To Happen just at the most 
exciting time. There our story ends 
with our four friends still searching 
for the Petrified Forest. 

Thanks A Million 
By Ruth Cossaboom 



SO STRANGE A THING 

AS POSTURE 

By Vera Clark, Biology 2 
^rWO young men waited hopeful- 
itl ly in the little room. They were 
^^ both waiting for a chance at 
the job as security salesman in a 
well known company. Neither of 
the young men had worked for a 
long time. They both had families 
to support. They both had watched 
those families of theirs grow thin- 
ner because of lack of proper food 
and care. This job was of equal 
importance to each of these young 
men. Which of them would get it? 

The light haired young man was 
tall and fairly proportioned. He 
had the makings of a fine looking 
man, yet he was not. Why? Be- 
cause he sat hunched in his chair — 
the picture of complete dejection 
and hopelessness. He seemed un- 
able to look the world in the face. 
There was a worn tired look in his 
eyes. 

The dark haired young man was 
also tall, but not so well proportion- 
ed nor so handsome in face as the 
other. But the difference was 
greater than that. Who could tell 
from the confident look in his face 
and the sparkle of humour in his 
eyes that he was in desperate need 
of the job ? Here was a man who 
had gone through horrible trials, 
but he would not let the world 
know that he was nearly beaten. 
In his hand was a cane, for one of 
his legs was wooden. In spite of 
his troubles he sat straight, his head 
held high, and his shoulders 
squared. 

A third man entered the waiting 



room insignificantly and sat down 
for a moment. After a short time 
he left with the memory of a brave- 
ly warm smile from the dark haired 
young man. 

The buzzer on the secretary's 
desk sounded. The secretary hur- 
ried into her employer's office. 
When she returned she smiled at 
the dark haired young man and 
said that Mr. Braxton had chosen 
him for the job. 

Several weeks later, Mr. Braxton 
answered his rival's question on 
how he had happened to obtain so 
fine a salesman as his newest one. 

"There were two young men in 
the room when I stepped in. And, 
well, you see I had studied Biology 
when I went to school, and I 
learned about posture. Yes, posture. 
You needn't laugh, because it's true. 
I learned that improper sitting and 
standing cramps your internal or- 
gans such as the lungs, the heart, 
the stomach, etc. You can't breathe 
properly and your food can't be di- 
gested properly. Your spinal col- 
umn is unable to keep the body bal- 
anced unless it curves naturally. 
All this strain on both the inside 
and the outside of your body is, 
naturally, going to tire you. You 
are not going to feel well. You are 
going to be always fatigued and un- 
able, therefore, to do your full 
quota of work. You agree with 
me, don't you? 

"Now those two young men were 
about the same age and both need- 
ed the job badly. But one of them, 
to use a slang expression, 'couldn't 
take it.' Whereas the other one, 
the one I chose, could smile in the 
face of a beating. In spite of a 



JUNE, 1936 



handicap, his lame leg is wooden 
you know, and in spite of having a 
family in need of medical care, 
and being near to utter hopeless- 
ness, that young man smiled and 
sat straight as a perfect arrow. He 
was determined to take his knock- 
out blow, so to speak, on the chin. 

"I knew that my customers 
would like that young man, because 
his bodily carriage fairly shouted 
good humour, pride, and courage." 

"Well," said the rival, "I think 
that's rather a queer way to choose 



a man. If my men succeeded in 
selling securities as well as yours 
do, I might be inclined to laugh at 
you. But they don't, so let me shake 
your hand for giving me a good 
idea." 

"If you try it, you'll find a big 
difference in your sales, old man. 
And I must admit, you need it." 
The two rivals, because they were 
really very good friends, put on 
their hats and left the office to- 
gether clubward bound. 



What would happen if: 

Henry Anderson didn't have a 

wise crack for everything. 
Stasia Twarog disagreed with 

Mr. McAleer. 
Helen Buckley didn't watch L. 

Haskell all the time. 
Hazel Macdonald didn't try to be 

funny. 
Lillian Sawler stood up to recite. 
Russell Towns carried a mirror 

with him. 
William Marshall lost his comb. 
Alice Camelio didn't go to Avon. 
Emma Shea couldn't answer a 

question. 
Mary Semensi stopped rolling 

her eyes. 
Beatrice Hotaling lost her accent. 
Ava Harrington did her English. 
Joseph Sullivan spoke plainly. 
Olive White didn't laugh at her 

own jokes. 
Herbert Ellis didn't watch the 

girls. 
Grace Ballantyne didn't blame 

things on H. Bucklev. 
Louise Walsh couldn't talk to 

Russell Towns. 
Edythe Jacobsen got thin. 
Mary Godfrey spoke aloud. 
Laurence Haskell wasn't conceit- 
ed. 
Hilda Robinson wasn't stuck up. 



C. Byron: What shall we do tonight? 

F. Harkins: One of three things. Go to 
the show, go roller skating, or stay home 
and study. 

C. Byron (spining coin) : If it's heads we 
go to the show, tails we go roller skating, 
and if it stands on edge we study. 



Would you recognize these : 

Russell States instead of Towns 
William Colonel 

instead of Marshall 
Emma Cart instead of Shea 

Olive Red instead of White 

Evelyn Lake instead of Poole 

Ethel Waters instead of Powers 
Frances Shelter instead of Lee 
Katherine Tigers 

instead of Lyons 
Dorothy Anchor 

instead of Moore 
Emerson Blocks 

instead of Rounds 
Connie Old instead of Young 
George Chaperon 

instead of Dean 
Irving Chocolate 

instead of Hersey 
Paul Brave instead of Hardy 
Edward Youthful 

instead of Young 
Frank Listens 

instead of Harkins 
Edward Telegraph 

instead of Marconi 
Mary Softy instead of Hardy 
Evelyn Stream instead of Poole 
David Weaks instead of Powers 
William General 

instead of Marshall 
Roy Maplehouse 

instead of Cederholm 
Frank Stabbing 

instead of Spearing 
Edward Aged instead of Young 
Kay Tigers instead of Lyons 

Evelyn Pennies 

instead of Nichols 
Emma Buggy instead of Shea 



STETSON ORACLE 



FRESHMAN 

7»rHE ORDINARY Freshman Class 
ill is just so much raw material to 
^^ be fashioned along the line 
that are going to develop the pu- 
pils' mental faculties and make 
them more useful to themselves and 
to the community in which they 
live. The average class is a cross- 
section of the entire community, 
representatives of stratum of soci- 
ety that one can find in the munici- 
pality. Randolph is the average 
New England town, and the classes 
in the High School are no different 
from those in every average New 

England High School, and this is 
especially true of our Freshman 
class, the Class of '39. There is no 
one in the class distinguished for 
outstanding characteristics, traits, 
or abilities. On the other hand 
there is no one in the class who is 
branded as lacking in those charac- 
teristics and abilities that make 
boys and girls average up with their 
neighbors, associates, and class- 
mates. 



Our class has done nothing out 
of the ordinary to which we can 
refer with boasting words. We 
have done nothing, however, to sub- 
ject us to criticism or bring our rep- 
utation into disrepute. We look to 
the future with hope and trust that 
through continued efforts to make 
the most of the opportunities 
placed at our disposal, through dil- 
igent effort on our part and earnest 
cooperation with the members of 
the High School faculty, we may 
leave High School three years 
hence with a reputation, not for 
brilliancy in individual effort, but 
rather with a reputation for being 
a class of willing and hard work- 
ing students who have been ambi- 
tious to acquire the fundamentals 
of a good education, and have been 
able to absorb and retain the prin- 
ciples and the teachings of the in- 
structors to whose care we have 
been entrusted. William Good, '39 



The meeting of the Sophomore 
Class was held last Ootober, 1935, 
with the following officers elected : 
President: Hudson Bowley 
Vice President: Blanch Spearin 
Secretary: Mary Murphy 
Treasurer: Charles McLeavy 
As the Sophomore Class is not 
very active in anything but sports, 
we have a few stars in the different 
fields of athletics. For instance, 
James Kennedy, who starred in 
football, basketball and baseball — 
quite a record for a Sophomore. 
Another star in basketball is 
Charles Haley, who played on 'the 
first team. George Kiley Jr. play- 
ed football on the second team but 
when they put him in, he smashed 
right through the opposition. He 
also played second team basketball 
but was running around with the 
ball quite a lot. George Cullen 
also played football on the second 
team. 

The boys seem to be more active 
than the girls, but we have to give 
Blanche Spearin, who played first 
team basketball, a lot of credit and 
also the other girls, Mary Mahoney, 
Mildred Cullen and Lillian Nor- 
man, all of whom tried for the first 
team but, sad to say, only made the 
second. Next year we expect to see 
them on the first team as we shall 
leave all our green customs behind 
for the freshmen and advance to 
the so-called "society" of the 
school. 



Sophomore to Freshman: How many 
studies are you carrying? 

Freshman: I'm carrying one and drag- 
ging three. 



Mr. McAleer (reading) : Then came the 
great dragon belching forth. 

T. Riley: Didn't he excuse himself? 



Mr. Riley in Physics: Shea, define "work." 
Shea: Everything's work. 
Mr. Riley: Do you mean to tell me this 
desk is work? 

Shea : Sure ; woodwork. 



Manager: Have you ever worked before 
in a theatre? 

Southern Boy: Usher has. 



JUNE, 1936 



Exchanges 



f^YOUR exchange editor has been 
4j snooping around in various 
S?5 school publications of late and 
has arisen from said employment 
with spots before her eyes. These 
spots would, if analyzed, turn out 
to be visions of the artistic covers of 
the exchange magazines. Her torn 
hair and wild eyes would instantly 
be attributed to the somewhat dis- 
turbing business of wishing she 
were a member of each of the 
schools separately as she eagerly 
perused the fascinating pages of its 
magazine teaming with school spir- 
it and personality. How one can 
be exchange editor and remain com- 
pletely and unquestionably true 
blue to her own alma mater has be- 
come quite beyond said editor of 
the Stetson ORACLE. But never 
let it be said that she is disloyal to 
Stetson — never! The school should 
be pleased to know that, after read- 
ing a rival publication and finding 
her blind love for Stetson a bit 
shaky, she instantly dived for the 
last ORACLE and redevoured its 
pages. This she found helped her 
immensely ; she passes it on to be 
used at the discretion of other ex- 
change editors who may find them- 
selves in the same state of difficul- 
ties. 

The Eastoner — Oliver Ames High 
School, North Easton 

The Christmas issue of this mag- 
azine contains some lovely page 
decorations. The cover design is 
exceptionally good. The jokes are 
good and so also is the cartoon by 
Wes Jenny. This magazine is, on 
the whole, excellent. 
Brocktonia — Brockton High School, 
Brockton 

This is a well set up publication 
that is in the style of a newspaper. 
Aunt Heliotrope's column is nicely 
witty and definitely to the point. 



We hope that Brockton High meets 
with success in its year book. 
The Unquity Echo — Milton High 
School, Milton 

This magazine has a lovely cover 
design and a nice Contents Page. 
All the stories are excellent. The 
story, "A Modern Christmas Carol" 
is unusual for a high school pupil. 
The poetry is good, especially 
"Caged Tiger." The exchange sec- 
tion couldn't be improved upon. 
This is a fine magazine from cover 
to cover. 

The Wampatuck — Braintree High 
School, Braintree 

February Edition. This is a truly 
beautiful magazine — lovely paper, 
print, and unusually good black and 
white cuts. The poetry is lovely and 
the short features interesting. The 
arrangement is well thought out and 
perfect in every detail. The hand 
colored cut in front is quaint. 
The Voice — Concord High School, 
Concord 

This regular monthly newspaper 
contains interesting items about the 
school goings-on. It contains also 
some very good editorials and sev- 
eral well written columns of humor. 
Old Gold and Purple — Warren 
Easton Boys' High School, New 
Orleans, La. 

Burlesque Issue, April. This issue 
is highly amusing. The cuts and 
drawings are very good. The column 
of Dr. Phil Os C. Fer shows an ex- 
cellent sense of humor and the 
Krazy definitions are funny and 
clever. 

May Issue. The special article on 
Governor Leche of Louisiana is very 
good and very interesting. This 
magazine leans greatly to the 
humorous and contains a wide num- 
ber of slams and jokes. 
The Reflector — Weymouth High 
School, Weymouth, Mass. 



8 



STETSON ORACLE 



February Issue. "The History of 
Weymouth, Mass." is interesting 
and different. The whole magazine 
is a nice mixture of history, well 
presented, and small items of inter- 
est. Jokes are presented cleverly 
and the column "Snoops" is unique. 
The poetry is very good, especially 
"Brave Ivanhoe" and "The Evolu- 
tion of the Joule," both were writ- 
ten by Carol 0. Seache. The ex- 
change column is well given. 
The Pingry Record — Pingry School, 
Elizabeth, New Jersey 



These regular publications follow 
the idea of what a good serious 
newspaper should be. The Editori- 
als, Book Reviews, and Movie Re- 
views are good. The column "Verb. 
Sap. Sat." is extremely interesting. 
The Abhis — Abington High School, 
Abington 

New Year Issue. The cover de- 
sign is very good and the title page 
is certainly to be commended. The 
article "Abhis Episodes" contains 
more truth than poetry in regard to 
Stetson High as well as to Abington 
High. 



SUPERLATIVES FRANK HARKINS' FIRST JOB 

, T „ . ,, , . Boss: Hey, there, you; didn't you tell me 

Mary Semensi Most gracious you never got tired? 

Roy Cederholm Shyest Harkins: That's right, boss; I always 

Joseph Sullivan Most athletic sto P and rest before r get tired. 

Russell Towns... Most dependable ~ ' 

Howard Wilbur Most scientific NEVER MIND 

Florence Willis. . . .Most courteous Liza: Ah wants a pair of shoes foh mah 

Ruth Walsh Most retiring ht S e ff!- Black kid? 

Joseph Salamone. . . .Most original Liza: You all jez mind your own busi- 

Olive White Most bashful ness and get me dem shoes. 

Fred Canavan Most winsome 

George Condon Most obliging Said the Senior to the Frosh: Have you 

Roy Anderson Most romantic ever noticed by the statistics that there are 

Stasia Twarog Best natured ™ r d e t ^ n d s e ? nts by automobiles than rail- 

Constance Young Chummiest Said the Frosh to the Senior: Well, you 

Margaret Sullivan . . . Most angelic never saw the engineer with his arm around 

James Ginnetty. .Most mischievous the fireman's waist, did you? 

Helen Buckley Merriest 

Robert Shirley Most solemn A young man went to South America 

Richard McAuliffe against his father's wishes. In one letter 

, u, „ , Most enthusiastic £^1*^5™ bought a ^ first 

Leahbelle Franklin .. Most graceful In a second letter he wrote: "Have 

Evelyn Nicoll ....... Most sociable bought a farm; second feather in my cap." 

This went on for some time, and always 

Prof: May I inquire why the young man ended with, "another feather in my cap." 

in the second row wears such a wide grin ? Later the father received a letter which 

Hag: When I see anything funny, I just read > "Dear Dad, send passage fare home; 

have to laugh. I am broke." 

Prof: Then you must find shaving a dan- To this the father replied: "Nothing 

gerous job. ' doing; take the feathers out of your hat 

and put them on your back and fly home." 

Ma: I'm thoroughly ashamed of your re- 

port card, Willie. How far were you from tir-ii, T j u. j j ± 

passing your final examination? Wllbur T : X don t need a speedometer on 

Willie: About three seats, Ma. "V^tJ-t C& t ^ Y f w ,f P * -*9 
Mr. Riley: Is zat so! How do you do it: 

Beneath the spreading chestnut tree v wilb " : Easy. When I go 15 miles an 

The village smithy snoozes; J, our - the h %} ts rattle ; when I go thirty 

No nag since 1898 £ he horn rattles; and when I go forty my 

Has been to him for shoeses. Dones rattIe - 

Do unto others before they do you. A hitch in time saves a dime. 

F. Harkins C. Byron 



JUNE, 1936 




The pupils of Stetson High feel 
that they owe several votes of 
thanks to the athletic coaches, Mr. 
Leavitt, Mr. Lynch, and Mr. Pow- 
derly, in their more than splendid 
work during this past year. With 
the aid of their extensive drilling 
and coaching, Stetson has led its 
way to many a victory and is now 
well up in the list of leaders. We are 
certainly proud of the excellent 
records in football, basketball and 
baseball ; and we know they, the 
coaches, laid the foundations for 
these records and helped substan- 
tially in the building of them. 
BASEBALL 

APRIL 1st is usually known as 
All Fools' Day, but on this 
day, last year's baseball play- 
ers met and elected Francis "Puck- 
ie" Duffy as their captain, and they 
showed they made a wise selection, 
because Stetson is enjoying one of 
its best seasons in baseball. 

Ball players were called out 
around the 4th of April and a large 
number reported. Prospects were 
not any too bright, because Coach 
Powderly had to fill rr> gaps at 
first base, shortstop, third base, 
and center field. Last year veterans 
were : Captain Duffy and Eddie 
Young as catchers ; Frank Spearin, 
Jim Kennedy, Albert Peters, infield- 
ers ; Joe Harris. Charles Harris, Red 
Foley, Buckie Wallace, outfielders. 
The pitchers were George Aberle 
and Bill Strickland, the latter a 
southpaw. The newcomers were 
Lawrence Haskell, who won himself 
the first base position by his timely 
hitting and the fine fielding; E. 
Young, E. Dockendorff. Frank Car- 
lino, Roy Borden, Bill Marshall, 
Hubble, George Miner, Joe Flynn, 



Chickie Hess, Bob Hess, Victor 

Lewis, Curran, F. Hart, R. Sarni, 

Dizzy Dean, R. Jones, E. De Ange- 

lis, Joe O'Connell, George Kiley, 

and two right hand pitchers, Tub- 

ber Aberle and Jack Downing. 

Irving Hersey was made manager 

and Tom Sullivan official scorer. 

Stetson High 7 — Thayer Academy 1 

Stetson 12 — Dighton 6 

Stetson 4 — Avon 3 

Stetson 24 — Weymouth Trade 11 

Stetson 10 — Sumner High 2 

Stetson High 28— Dighton 11 

Stetson 9 — Foxboro 4 
Stetson High 2 — Oliver Ames 1 



DIAMOND DUST 

TJfOM Sullivan has been official 
l|L scorer and he certainly has 
done a swell job. 

Randolph secured 18 new base- 
ball suits and they look pretty 
classy. 

Irving Hersey and Shrimp La 
Belle are the assistant managers 
and see all the games. 

Coach Powderly has been shift- 
ing his lineup around trying* to get 
a dependable shortstop. Charles 
Harris has moved in from the out- 
field and has been doing well. 

The tennis court started last year 
is almost complete. A fence has 
been erected around the court, the 
money being supplied from the 
people in the town, through the 
process of tag day. Mr. Gilgan 
started things moving. 

Randolph has made 124 hits to 
the visitors' 108, and has scored 
138 runs to the visitors' 54. 

This year's freshmen class has 
plenty of baseball material for 
Coach Powderly to pick from. 



10 



STETSON ORACLE 



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12 



STETSON ORACLE 




'AN APRIL SHOWER' 



The universe glittering brightly above, 
Over everything it seemed to love, 
Sending its golden rays here and there, 
Traveled the sunshine without a care. 

Way up in the heavens appears 

A billowy cloud which slowly draws near. 

Tiny raindrops begin to fall ; 

April showers have come after all. 

Wet and slimy appear the streets, 
Now the rain comes in driving sheets. 
People scurrying here and there 
Never thinking of rain, for they don't care. 

April showers are refreshing and warm, 
Aiding the green grasses of the lawn. 
Flowers also find their way 
Above the earth in brilliant array. 

Rain of Heaven : Rain of Glory, 
Comes to tell the earth its story, 
Bringing magic to everything, 
And even making the bluebirds sing. 

Rain of Spring: April Showers, 

Come to us and bring May-flowers! 

Rows and rows of tulip beds, 

To sway and bow their radiant heads, 

While bluebells in the meadow gay 

Nod their heads out toward the bay, 

To welcome the dawn of on-coming day. 

Ruth Hayden 



MY IDEAL 



Her hair, a chestnut brown 

Just slipped from the green burr, 

Is wary, soft, and found 
A beautiful coiffure. 

Her sky-blue eyes forecast 
A storm when she is sad, 

They shine with light of past 
Years' stars when she is glad. 

Her teeth are pearls of loveliness 

Uncovered by a smile 
That is as sweet as the caress 

Of any tiny child. 



She's only five feet two, 

But like a pirate bold, 
To me, perhaps to you, 

She's worth her weight in gold. 

Anna McGrory 



THE MOONBEAM 



The moonbeam crept into the room, 

It darted here and there, 
At last it lingered on 

The face of a child so fair. 

The moonbeam caressed the round cheeks, 
It shone on the curly golden hair, 

It lightly danced on the counterpane 

And disclosed her hands which were fold- 
ed there. 

With a veil of radiance soft 

It looked upon her eyes, 
And beheld her lashes silken, long, 

As dark as midnight skies. 

Her lips like rosebuds were formed 
As the moonbeam strayed their way; 

He looked on gently, and with a last caress 
That moonbeam went away. 

— Thelma Hennigar. 



TIGGER 
Vera Clark 

I have a cat, 

His name is "Tigger." 
He once was small 

But now he's bigger. 
He's black and gray 

And very striped; 
When not fed on time 

He feels quite slighted. 
His paws are black, 

His eyes are green, 
When I don't pet him 

He thinks me mean. 
He has silky fur 

And is always sleepy, 
His agonized meows 

Would make one creepy. 
His nose is scratched, 

His whiskers are fine, 
He's an awful grouch 

But I'm glad he's mine. 



OUR ADVERTISERS— STETSON ORACLE 





RANDOLPH TAXI 


The World's in White Shoes 


CHARLES E. BOYLE '23 


Why not You? 


Stand at 75 No. Main St., next to 


White Shoes for the whole 
Family at 


First National Store 
Tel. Ran. 0181-W 


Dumanis 
Shoe Store 






6-8 Lincoln Street 


James J. Kelleher, Opt.D. 

OPTOMETRIST 


Opp. City Hall, Brockton 


63 Main Street, Brockton 




233 No. Main Street, Randolph 




The Quality Store 


WREN'S 


WARREN PHARMACY 


FUNERAL HOME 


Incorporated 


RANDOLPH 


PAUL H. BOYLE, Reg. Pharm. 

166 No. Main Street 


Tel. RAN 0354 


Randolph, Mass. 




Telephones: Ran. 0411 0182 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


Holbrook Service Station 


F. J. CURRAN 

Plumbing and Heating 


North Franklin Street 


RANDOLPH, MASS. 



OUR ADVERTISERS— STETSON ORACLE 



GOOD BROTHERS 



Invite all to 



TO RIDE AND DRIVE 



THE NEW FORDV-8 



Faster Acceleration 

All Steel Bodies 

90 Miles Per Hour 



Larger Roomier Bodies 
Safety Glass 
1 1 2-inch Wheelbase 



RANDOLPH 189 



AS LOW AS $617.00 DELIVERED 



McAULIFFE MARKET 

MEATS— FISH— FRUIT 
GROCERIES 

105 NO. MAIN ST. RANDOLPH 
Tel. 0399 

WM. F. MAGUIRE 

D. M. D. 

Closed Wednesday Afternoons, 

Open Evenings-Sundays 

by Appointment 

Masonic Block Tel. 0547-W 

Randolph 

Home Phone 0313-R 

MARTIN E. YOUNG 

Representative to General 

Court 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Randolph, Holbrook and Avon 

Ninth Norfolk District 

Member Committee on Highways and 

Motor Vehicles 



Frank Diauto 

COAL— OIL— GRAIN 

and Building Supplies 

Depot, RANDOLPH, MASS. 

Telephone 0068 
Warren Street near Railroad 



OUR ADVERTISERS— STETSON ORACLE 



EDGAR'S 



A BROCKTON INSTITUTION 



Divided we stand . . . divided we sit . . . 
and divided we do everything in sports this 
summer! For the divided skirt is the most 
important sport style of the season. Culottes, 
they're called . . . and a feminine version of 
trousers they are. We have 'em in cotton at 
$1. Two-piece culotte frocks are priced at 
$1.98. For sale now on our second flodjr. 



RANDOLPH 
TRUST COMPANY 

Randolph, Mass. 

WE SOLICIT YOUR CHECKING ACCOUNT 

Deposits up to $5,000 insured by the Federal 

Deposit Insurance Corporation 

JOSEPH T. LEAHY, Pres. JAMES V. DONOVAN, Treas 



OUR ADVERTISERS— STETSON ORACLE 



Compliments of 



George V. Higgins, M.D. 



Randolph Savings Bank 

Incorporated 1851 

Savings Accounts Travelers' Checks 

Christmas Club Foreign Drafts 

Tax Clubs 

A MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK FOR 84 YEARS 



OUR ADVERTISERS— STETSON ORACLE 



ESTABLISHED 1898 



Compliments of 



in 



M. B. CLAFF & SONS, Inc. 

Paper Box Makers and Printers 

RANDOLPH NEWS CO., INC. 

Delicious Cooling Drinks at Our Fountain 



Picnic Supplies 
Candy 



School Supplies 
Tobacco 



BEST LINE OF MAGAZINES 



105 NORTH MAIN STREET 



McAULIFFE'S BLOCK 



Telephone 0280 



START EARLY-MAKE THIS 
YOUR BANK 

DEPOSITS AS LOW AS $1.00 PER MONTH 
SHARES ALWAYS ON SALE 

Randolph Co-operative Bank 



— .. — . — 1 1 



OUR ADVERTISERS— STETSON ORACLE 



Summer Terms Begins July 13 

Day School Fall Term Begins Sept. 8 

Night School Begins Oct, 6 




PLANNING YOUR FUTURE 

is the title of a valuable catalogue which we have published for young people 
who want to secure positions with opportunities for advancement. It explains 
how the high school or college graduate can capitalize previous education. It 
shows how to save time and money in qualifying for a business position. It tells 
how our free Employment Department helps to place graduates at good salaries. 
Write or telephone for a copy of this catalogue. 

BROCKTON BUSINESS COLLEGE 

C. W. JONES, Pres. 



224 MAIN STREET 



Telephone 635 



Compliments of 



Kay Jewelry 



BROCKTON, MASS. 



Baird & McGuire, Inc. 

Manufacturing Chemists 



HOLBROOK, 



MASS. 



OUR ADVERTISERS— STETSON ORACLE 



NOW 



YOU CAN PURCHASE YOUR 

ELECTROLUX 

GAS REFRIGERATOR 

FOR AS LITTLE AS $2.28 A MONTH 

BROCKTON GAS LIGHT COMPANY 

HOOKER BROTHERS 

MANUFACTURERS OF ICE CREAM 
WHOLESALE and RETAIL 

Telephone Randolph 470-W 

PLANT, SCHOOL STREET HOLBROOK 

AFTER HIGH SCHOOL — MALTBY'S 

Secretarial Training Paves the Way to a Greater Success in the 

Business Office, the College Class Room, or the Home. 

Tuition $18 per Month, Evenings $6 

A Small Investment for a Large Return 

Established 1905 
STOUGHTON SQUARE 

F. J. LEAHY 

Successor to M. E. Leahy 
HARD AND SOFT COAL 

RANGE and FUEL OILS 

WARREN STREET Telephone 0047-W 



OUR ADVERTISERS— STETSON ORACLE 



Compliments of 

FRANK C. WALSH 

The Pioneer Store 

North Main Street 


CONRAD'S GROCERY 
CHAIN STORE PRICES 

Open 7 A.M.-9 P.M. 

Open Sundays 

31 NO. MAIN STREET 

RANDOLPH 


Compliments of 

WHITE, the Florist 

HOLBROOK, MASS. 


[ Compliments of 

S. CANNIZZARO 
RANDOLPH SHOE REPAIR 

SHOP 
Shoe Shine Expert 

Service and Quality 
SHORT STREET RANDOLPH 


Compliments of 

dan McCarthy 

THE BARBER 


Compliments of 

WINER'S 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

STORE 

Tel. 0003 Randolph 


Byron's Drug Store 

THE REXALL STORE 

The Store of Quality 

and Service 

Telephone Ran. 0615 and 0655 

Open from 8 A.M. to 11 P. M. 

Free Delivery 

■ — — 


SALOMONE SHOE SHOP 

Headquarters for 

ARTHUR FISCHER SHOES 

Shoe Repairing at Lowest Cost 



NORTHEASTERN 
UNIVERSITY 




DAY DIVISION 



THE 
SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

In co-operation with engineer- 
ing firms, offers curricula lead- 
ing to the Bachelor of Science 
degree in the following bran- 
ches of engineering: 
Civil Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 
Electrical Engineering 
Chemical Engineering 
Industrial Engineering 



THE 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

ADMINISTRATION 

Co-operating with business 
firms, offers courses leading to 
the degree of Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in the following fields of 
business : 
Accounting 
Banking and Finance 
Business Management 



The Co-operative Plan of training enables the student to 
combine theory with two years of practice and makes it possible 
for him to earn his tuition and a part of his other school expenses. 



For catalog or any further information write to: 



NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 



MILTON J. SCHLAGENHAUF, Director of Admissions 
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS